Scuccuzzu

Scuccuzzu

On first appearances Scuccuzu  appears to be just a simple pasta shape for soups.  However it is living testament to a faraway culture, decendent of Ligurians who settled in Northern Africa and their traditions  which date as far back as the 1200s.

At this time various communities of Genoese settlers resided on the far shores of the Mediterranean (in Marsacares and Tabarca to name a few). As the years past, the Genoese Coral harvesters in Tabarca began to adopt local costumes and the Tunisian culinary traditions to the point where ‘Cuc cus’   became a staple food for them as well. In  a document dating back to 1727,  in a list of the coral harvesters, a provision called coscozò  was mentioned. This most probably identified a type of pasta,  made using the same technique as ‘cus cus’- by forming dampened durum wheat semolina into small balls of a slightly larger size and then left to dry. This drying process allowed for these small ‘balls’ of pasta to be conserved and transported and were therefore a useful staple for the Genoese colonies.  According to noted food historian Giovanni Rebora,  ‘cocozò’soon  became a staple in Genoa where it was transformed in local dialect to be known as ‘scuccuzzù’ .  The numerous local pastifici began to produce it through extraction, transforming the little ‘balls’ into small cylinders which in Liguria are often used in Minestrone soup.

However the uses of this characteristic pasta are many.  In fact decendents of these Genoise colonies  known as ‘tabarchini’  living in Carloforte and Calasetta, in southern Sardinia still maintain these traditions using ‘scuccuzzù’ to make a succulent pasta dish with seafood known as ‘pilau’.

Product Details

Pasta Type: Pasta of Durum Wheat

Processing: Short Cut Pasta

Packaging: Bag

Weight: 500gr

Cooking Time: 15 minutes

EAN Code: 8007138000171

Item Code: 71

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